CFPUA and Lead

HOW DOES CFPUA REDUCE LEAD FROM HOME PLUMBING?Lead Service Line Gooseneck

CFPUA has a Corrosion Control Program in place across its three water systems: the Sweeney Water System, the Richardson Water System, and the Monterey Heights Water System.

This program uses orthophosphate to inhibit corrosion in all piping from the water treatment plant to customers' faucets, including older lines and internal plumbing fixtures that may contain lead or lead solder. 

Orthophosphate is a common, FDA-approved food additive that coats the pipes and internal plumbing fixtures and significantly inhibits lead and copper from dissolving into tap water.

HOW DOES CFPUA MONITOR LEAD and copper IN DRINKING WATER?

CFPUA also has a Lead and Copper Sampling Program, regulated under the U.S. EPA's Lead and Copper Rule (also known as the LCR). EPA established the LCR in 1991 to control lead and copper in drinking water. Since 1991 the LCR has undergone various revisions. An updated LCR, expected to go into effect in the coming years, will bring changes to the sampling program.

Learn more about the revised lead and copper rule

Currently, at a minimum of every three years, CFPUA works with customers to conduct lead and copper sampling. The EPA's regulatory criteria is used to select participating customers. Preferred sampling locations meet one or more of the following criteria:

  • Single-family homes or buildings, including multi-family residences, that contain lead pipes or copper pipes with lead solder installed between 1983 and 1985
  • Properties served by lead service lines
  • Single-family residences that contain copper pipes with lead solder installed before 1983

The laboratory results of all samples are used to determine compliance for the water system overall. EPA considers water systems to be in compliance if the 90th percentile of all laboratory results of the samples collected is below 15 parts per billion (ppb) for lead and 1.3 parts per million (ppm) for copper. Customers are notified of the results of the samples collected from their homes.

DOES CFPUA MONITOR LEAD IN schools?

For the first time, the planned Lead and Copper Rule Revision would require community water systems to test for lead in drinking water in elementary schools and childcare facilities in their service area. The water system is also required to provide timely results along with information about the actions the elementary school or child-care facility can take to reduce lead in drinking water.

CFPUA will be working with local schools and childcare facilities as the new rule comes into effect.